Why Osteopathy?

December 2, 2010

Ever since I took action to enhance my career by studying osteopathy at Canadian College of Osteopathy my patients have been asking me what exactly it is I’m studying.  Some of my patients have been adventurous and attempted to put a defining word to what it is which usual ends up being “osteo means bone right? or “oh osteopathy, you do treats on bones?”  My answer is always “yes along with the rest of the body.”

The profession of osteopathy is so vast in its entirety that it is difficult to give a brief explanation as to what exactly it is, but I am going to attempt this great feat!

Let’s start by saying that osteopathy is a science and an art.  Curious statement I know, but when you see that it is a science because it requires a keen and in depth knowledge of anatomy and an art because through the use of trained hands an assessment of the entirety of the patient can be gained that statement starts to make sense.  Osteopathy comes from the word “osteome” which means structures of all living matter i.e. bone, soft tissue, organs, veins, arteries, etc.  and “pathos” which translates into “a profound emotion” or “an emotion which needs to be expressed”.   So when you put “Osteome” and “Pathos” together to form the word “Osteopathy” you have a word that implies that the whole person and how they express themselves must be taken into consideration as that person is treatment in their entirety.   It is the job of the osteopathy to restore mobility to each system so the body can be balanced both in its internal and external environments.

Over the past 3 months I have been incorporation osteopathic techniques into my patient’s treatment plans with great success.  I had a new patient a few weeks back that came into the clinic with a hamstring strain that normally takes 6 weeks of rehab to heal.  In three treatments over a week and a half I used a few osteopathic techniques to regain balance in the lower back, hip area and balanced out the body to create homeostasis.   My patient can back for their 4th treatment and had regained their normal range of motion back in their hamstring and their pain was down from 6/10 to 2/10 and I had not even touched their hamstring yet!  Another patient I had not seeing in a while came in last weekend for treatment after a car accident.  Their body was achy and they were visibly tired.  I did an hour treatment for them.  A few days later they came in and looked wonderful.  Their colour was back and the dark circles under their eyes where gone along with their stooped posture.

If you have not had a change to be treated osteopathically now is the time.  If you are unsure as to what an osteopath can treat just remember an osteopath is able to assess anything in the body and works with other health care professionals to ensure your greatest quality of health.

For more information contact Ultimate Sports Therapy at info@ultimatesportstherapy.com or visit us at http://www.ultimatesportstherapy.com/osteopathy.html

Carolyn Zepf
osteopathy (current study) & Certified Athletic Therapist, Keynote & Professional Speaker


Ultimate Sports Therapy Annual Pot Luck Holiday Party

November 24, 2010


Myofascial Technique for Back Pain

October 21, 2010

Most people have no idea what techniques their therapist uses during their treatments.  Have you ever gone to your physical therapist and asked for them to use a “Myofascial technique” on you to get rid of your back pain?  I would guess no you have not.   That being said it is important to have some idea of treatment methods and how they work.  Let us began by looking into what a Myofascial technique is and what it can do to improve your pain.  First and foremost we must discuss fascia.  Fascia is an expansive connective tissue that covers every muscle, blood vessel, bone, nerve, organ, the brain and spinal cord and is present at a cellular level.  The function of fascia is that of support both dynamic and static, transportation system for fluids, and in healing through the laying down of scar tissue.    Injury or overuse can lead into fascial restrictions which will cause poor cellular function, disease, pain, and dysfunction throughout the entire body and in some causes lead into seemingly unrelated symptoms.

So what is a Myofascial release technique?  Your therapist would by using their hands exaggerate the tension in your fascia with a constant light traction and while maintaining this traction they would follow those tensions until a still point was reached – a still point is a point at which there is no movement.  At this point they would assist the tissue to an improved range of motion.  This technique places the tissue into a position of ease.  By doing this the fascia will unwind and relax which will help normalize tension, return mobility, increased circulation in blood flow and waste removal and overall vitality to the injured area.

For more information contact Ultimate Sports Therapy at info@ultimatesportstherapy.com or visit us at http://www.ultimatesportstherapy.com/osteopathy.html

Carolyn Zepf
osteopathy (current study) & Certified Athletic Therapist, Keynote & Professional Speaker


What is Back pain

September 23, 2010

What is Back pain

Most of us think of back pain as sharp pain that can happen with lifting or bending forward.  Back pain can feel like someone pinching you or it could be as bad as a sharp knife in our back .  Some of us have experienced variations of this and really do not know what we have done.

Back pain is perceived by our nervous system and interpreted by our brain.  If our nervous system senses that something is wrong it sends an electrical impulse to the spinal cord and brain.   The speed of the impulse can vary in travel time.   If the back pain is dull then it will travel at a slow speed to the brain while severe back pain travels at faster rate to the brain to warn you that something is seriously wrong.

Once pain messages arrive at your brain, the brain quickly interprets the messages of pain. The limbic center of the brain also produces emotions such as anxiety, fear or frustration that often accompany back pain. It’s at this point that you actually begin to feel back pain.

Your brain reacts to the back pain messages by locating the source of the injury, assessing the damage and determining a course of action.  Pain is individual for everyone and must be respected and taken care of.  Pain is the body’s way of telling you something is wrong to make sure you are listening.

For more information contact Ultimate Sports Therapy at info@ultimatesportstherapy.com or visit us at www.ultimatesportstherapy.com

Carolyn Zepf,
Athletic Therapist, Osteopathy Student.


Superman Exercise

August 22, 2010

http://www.ultimesportstherapy.com Ultimate Sports Therapy’s Carolyn Zepf shows how to do a Superman Exercise Read the rest of this entry »


Pelvic Rock Exercise

August 21, 2010

http://www.ultimesportstherapy.com Ultimate Sports Therapy’s Carolyn Zepf shows how to do a Pelvic Rock Exercise Read the rest of this entry »


Pelvic Bridge Exercise

August 20, 2010

http://www.ultimesportstherapy.com Ultimate Sports Therapy’s Carolyn Zepf shows how to do a Pelvic Bridge Exercise Read the rest of this entry »


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